Tidbits - February 11, 2021

TIDBITS by RALPH SHEALY


RECRUITING STARS
  I’m watching the Super Bowl with my laptop on my lap, attempting to write my column.
  I hate typing on a laptop. Even though I can type, I find my self hunting and pecking on a laptop. I could go in my room and sit at my desktop and do this. I’ve got two TVs in my bedroom, but it is just not the same.
   I saw an interesting meme last week on recruiting and the Super Bowl.
  College fanatics put so much emphasis on recruiting rankings.
  Clemson did it’s usual great in the recruiting rankings, but Carolina had the worst recruiting year in its history. The Gamecocks finished last in the SEC, behind Vanderbilt. How humiliating!
  Of course, the poor recruiting had something to do with the firing of Muschamp in mid-season. Some of his recruits decommitted, but recruiting experts said the Gamecocks were going to do poorly this year, even if Muschamp had been retained.
  Shane Beamer did a good job loading up with transfers, who can play immediately next year, but transfers are not counted in rankings.
  The meme I mentioned above throws some light on the recruiting “star” rank-ings.
  In this year’s Super Bowl there is only one 5-star high school recruit, Leonard Fournette of the Chiefs.
 KC has 12 4-stars, and Tampa Bay has eight. KC has 10 3-stars, the Bucs have 12.
  Kansas City has 19 below a 3-star, and Tampa Bay has 22.
  That’s 63 players in the Super Bowl rated 3-star or below.
  That should tell you something about the recruiting star system.


REAL STARS
  In a week’s time, the entertainment world last Cloris Leachman, 94, Cicely Tyson, 96, Hal Holbrook, 95, and Christopher Plummer, 91. These were some of the greatest actors of all time.
  I’m sure the combined Emmy, Oscar and Tony totals for these four is impressive.
  Dustin Diamond was less than half their ages when he died. He was not an award winning actor, but he’ll always be remembered as Screech on “Saved by the Bell.”
  Jim Weatherly, a Grammy Award winning song writer also died last week.
  I read an interesting story about one of his greatest songs.
  Lee Majors, the “Six Million Dollar Man,” was one of Weatherly’s good friends.
  One day he called Lee, and Lee’s girlfriend Farrah Fawcett answered. They talked for awhile, then Farrah said she had to go, because she was “leaving on the midnight plane to Houston.”
  Weatherly said a light went on, and he thought that would be a great title for a song, so he wrote it.
  Of course, he did some tweaking to the song, and Gladys Knight won a Grammy, singing the “Midnight Train to Georgia.” He  also wrote “Neither One of Us,” and “You’re the Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me,” for Gladys and the Pips.
  Those are three of my favorite songs. Aren’t we all glad Farrah had to catch a midnight plane?!!!


MEMORIES
  Practically every Tuesday morning,  I’d see Chester Chrisley at one of the convenience stores when I’d deliver papers. We’ nod and say “hello,” and he’d usually buy a paper.
  He drove a little Chevy HHR, and one afternoon I heard of a wreck on the scanner, and the vehicle was described as a little burgundy car that looked like a PT Cruiser. I wondered if it was Chester.
  It was. Chester died from his wreck injuries  last week. You know how it is. I still expected to see him on my route.
  I’ve known Gayle Smith Williams and her husband Mike for a long time. I’ve bought a few cars from Mike over the years when he was at Saluda Motor Sales and we rode the same school bus in the dark ages.
  Gayle’s brother Sonny was a Saluda High football quarterback legend, who signed with Clemson and went on to have a outstanding military career.
  My first big memory of Gayle was when she won the Miss Saluda title. I was there, and I remember she sang “Downtown,” and I thought she sounded just like Petula Clark.
  I always enjoyed talking to her when she’d come into our office.
  I’ve always felt if Harry Rude could find a round metal bar long enough, he could move a pyramid.
  I  first witnessed him in action when the Keelers built the new office at 302 North Main Street, and all that heavy equipment had to moved from the old North Main location.
  Harry and his team used those metal bars and put the machines in place, like he was parking a car.
  When Marty bought a giant paper cutter in Columbia, Harry went to get it, and rolled it in place, and when I lost the building Harry found a way to put that paper cutter in my shop.
  He was a master at his profession.
  Saluda County will miss Chester, Gayle and Harry.